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Amazing ways by which stock prices are defined in Nepal | Benjamin Graham’s Mr. Market

If you are new to the stock market and are curious about the prices that move up and down, then you are not alone. You might think about how exactly are stock prices defined in Nepal? In this article, you will understand the following:

Who defines the stock prices

The most distinct image that probably comes to your mind when you think about the stock market is the color pattern that represents the price of a stock moving either up or down. But the thought of trying to answer how it is happening can be a bit overwhelming. How exactly are the prices of these stocks defined? The answer, to be honest, is quite simple. The price of stocks is defined by the buyers and the sellers who trade the shares.

How are stock prices defined in Nepal | Benjamin Graham's Mr. Market

The stock market moves up and down based on the number of buyers and sellers in the market at any given point in time. The market at a given point in time is either a buyer’s market or a seller’s market.

The buyer’s market

The buyer’s market is defined as a point in time when the number of sellers is greater than the number of buyers. In such a case, the buyers get to move the market as they are the minority. i.e., demand is less compared to the supply. And if you go back to classical economic theory. When the supply is greater than the demand, prices fall. As there are fewer buyers, they get to define the price and will most likely want to buy a stock at a bargain price.

The seller’s market

Conversely, The seller’s market is defined as a point in time when the number of sellers is less than the number of buyers. In such a case, the sellers get to move the market as they are the minority. i.e., demand is high compared to the supply. And if you go back to classical economics theory. When the supply is lower than the demand, prices go up. As sellers get to define the price, they will most likely want to sell a stock at a high price.

Hence, this constant tug of war between the buyers and the sellers is what moves the market. And this tug of war, in turn, defines the stock prices.

In Nepal, to buy or sell a stock in the secondary market, you need a broker. A broker acts as a mediator between the buyer and the seller. Every time a trade happens, the broker who completes the trade takes a small commission. When it comes to buying and selling a stock, there can be different kinds of orders that can be placed. In Nepal, we only use one of these methods. But I will highlight a few others to show a broad perspective on how trades can be accomplished.

Benjamin Graham’s Idea of Mr. Market (Summary)

As you can see from the things we discussed above that only a few trades can easily change the market price of a stock. That is why it should not matter what the market as a whole is doing in the short run. The trading of stocks at a certain price does not reflect the true value of a company. This is especially true in the short run. The market price of a stock, in the long run, is defined by how well the company does socially and financially.

Benjamin Graham’s Mr. Market is like an emotionally disturbed business partner. You can’t change his behavior, but you can react to it. Hence graham says to use Mr. Market as a servant and not as a guide. Mr. Market’s emotions are a projection of what the stock market is doing at a given point in time. When the market is doing good, Mr. Market keeps screaming at you to buy-in. Some of the things Mr. Market will say to you when the market is booming are :

  • How can the market go down when things are going so well.
  • You are an idiot to be not investing at this moment. You are losing money by not investing.

Similarly, when the market is crashing Mr. Market will say things like :

  • you will never make money in the market, it’s hopeless
  • Sell everything and save whatever you can.

Therefore, you should never follow Mr. market’s emotions. Here, Mr. Market is the representation of the general human perception of the stock market. You should always remain calm regardless of what Mr. Market tells you to do. Instead of following Mr. market sentiments, you should always try to competently evaluate your risk and invest in companies only if you think that the investment is worth it. Use the opportunities created by Mr. Market while not getting wrapped up in the emotions he creates. And if you do so, in the long run, this single principle will help you the most.

Summary

  • Buyers and Sellers define the market price of a stock by competing with one other.
  • Mr. Market is like an emotionally disturbed business partner, and you should never follow what he says without evaluation.

Last articles on Value Investing

For more research: you should check out https://www.theinvestorspodcast.com/ as I am sharing the ideas I learned from his videos 

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This Post Has 4 Comments

  1. Ayush

    “I do not know if you can place the market and limit orders in Nepal. I haven’t tried it myself.”

    You have misunderstood limit, stop and market orders at the time of writing this article. In NEPSE, Limit is the default order. There is option for Market order, but there is no stop order in NEPSE.

    Also your examples of Limit and Stop order look wrong to me.

    1. RT

      Yes, it seems like it! Thanks. I think the issue was that at the time I did not have a NOTS account so I was just asking my brokers to use a fixed price. I feel like I have a better understanding of it now. I think the examples are correct however I mixed up the default system of trade. I have fixed it now!

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